Tag Archives: Mikki Murray

Legislative District 66 LWV Forum Sept 10, 2020

The League of Women Voters held a Candidate Forum on September 10, 2020. The video below runs roughly one hour. The candidates for the Forum were from the DFL & the Republican Party of Minnesota.

Senate District 66 Candidates are Greg Copeland an East Side Republican, and the 33 year Career Politician John Marty (has served since January 1987).

House District 66A Candidates are Republican Brett Rose, and the Career Politician DFLer Alice Hausman.

House District 66B Candidates are the Republican Mikki Murray and Athena Hollins the DFLer who knocked off the Endorsed Career Politician John Lesch in the August Primary.


Meet HD 66B GOP Candidates Murray & Copeland at Tin Cup’s Sept 11th 6-8 pm

Pause to Remember…

September 11th is a time to remember what happened 19 years ago in New York City, Washington DC, a field in Pennsylvania, and to where ever you were at on 9/11/01 when this  country was attacked for being the Beacon of Freedom in the World.  We came together to help one another out.  We praised the self-less actions of our First Responders, and we Republicans still do. It was a day to remember and also a day for action…

September 11th 2020 is also a day to remember the past, recent times (Late May 2020 to now), and a day of action.

A Day of Action

It’s Campaign Season and many voters have a week before they can start voting by absentee ballot on September 18th to vote in the General Election. So we’re having a Meet & Greet on Sept 11th, at Tin Cup’s from 6-8 pm.  Feel free to mask up and stop by.  Tin Cup’s has a great all-you-can-eat Fish Fry every Friday, and Gidget Bailey is serving the Deep Fried Tacos from last year’s Trash Wars Fundraisers.  So if you can’t make it to the event check out the websites and contact info of our endorsed candidates as well as Tin Cup’s menu below.

Meet the Endorsed Republican Candidates of HD 66B

Mikki Murray

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Website: mikkimurray.com

Email:   MikkiMurray4MNHouse@gmail.com 

Campaign Phone: 651-321-8387

Mikki Murray Donation Link 

(HD 66B GOP is posting the link as a courtesy, we do not get any of the $)


Greg Copeland

Website: gregcopeland911.wordpress.com

Facebook:  www.facebook.com/Greg-Copeland-For-Saint-Paul

Email:  Gregcopeland1@comcast.net

By the way, if you are wondering about the 911 of Greg’s website name, it is his birthday.  So it’s his birthday on September 11th, wish him a Happy Birthday.

He wanted the Headline for the post to be “John Marty’s 1st Retirement Party,” as John Marty has been in the Minnesota Legislature since January 1987.  It’s time to help John Marty Career Politician to find a new career.


Tin Cup’s

We’re having our Meet & Greet at Tin Cup’s at the corner of Rice St & Maryland Ave W in St Paul.  Gidget Bailey, the owner, is a leader in the North End Neighborhood.  She has held a number of Grassroots Causes, and fundraisers for those less fortunate or those who had an unexpected expense.

She welcomes all who come to her business.  She has a great menu, free wi-fi, great drink specials, and a great neighborhood atmosphere.

This year has been tough on neighborhood businesses as the China Virus has hit many businesses small and great with mostly uncertainty and a lack business.  Gidget has an online ordering service which you can stop by and pick something up to go.

Tin Cup’s Online Ordering

Tin Cup’s Menu

Happy Women’s Suffrage Day, 100 yrs of Women’s Right to Vote, August 18, 1920 to Now

Women’s Suffrage was borne out of the American Abolitionism Movement


On August 18, 1920 the State of Tennessee became the 36th state to pass the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution guaranteeing Women the Right to Vote.  Minnesota was the 15th State to pass it on September 8, 1919.

Seneca Falls Convention & Declaration of Sentiments

It wasn’t the first attempt at passing an amendment for women to be allowed to vote, in fact it started up about 72 years earlier in Seneca Falls, New York at a Women’s Rights Convention started by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. They were abolitionists who turned to advocate for women’s rights.  At the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention Mott, Stanton and other women put together a list modeled after the Declaration of Independence called the “The Declaration of Sentiments.” 

The Declaration of Sentiments offered examples of how men oppressed women such as:

  • preventing them from owning land or earning wages
  • preventing them from voting
  • compelling them to submit to laws created without their representation
  • giving men authority in divorce and child custody proceedings and decisions
  • preventing them from gaining a college education
  • preventing them from participating in most public church affairs
  • subjecting them to a different moral code than men
  • aiming to make them dependent and submissive to men

Stanton read the Declaration of Sentiments at the convention and proposed women be given the right to vote, among other things. Sixty-eight women and 32 men signed the document—including prominent abolitionist Frederick Douglass—but many withdrew their support later when it came under public scrutiny. (source History.com)

Post Civil War and Reconstruction Period

Following the Civil War the late President Abraham Lincoln’s Reconstruction plan had been altered as he was no longer around to over see it.  The 13th Amendment had been passed in 1865 ending slavery officially, the 14th and 15th Amendments had been passed to grant Civil Rights and Equal Protection under the law; and Voting Rights to former slaves respectively.

At the time Women thought they could register to vote with the passage of the 15th Amendment’s language allowing voting rights. The language of the article did not mention gender so it was vague, but since it wasn’t explicitly directing women to be able to vote, any woman who did was arrested.  This is when Susan B Anthony was arrested in 1872.

Susan B Anthony was an abolitionist who was also a member of the Temperance Movement.  The Temperance Movement was a social movement to curb alcohol consumption and eventually they succeeded to prevent the sale and production of alcohol.  So before you shout hooray for Susan B Anthony think of how she helped to organize crime in America in an indirect way by helping bootleggers to smuggle illegal alcohol in the early part of the 20th century.  The amount of misery heaped upon Americans not being able to have a drink of alcohol makes today’s social distancing and mask wearing pale in comparison.

Susan B Anthony died in 1906 at the age of 86, and 14 years later the 19th Amendment was named in her honor.

Split in Suffrage Movements

During Reconstruction the Suffrage for Black Men went one way and Women’s Suffrage went another way. There was a difference in the abolitionists.  Most advocated for Voting Rights for Black Men which resulted in the 15th Amendment.

One could question why this was so but the industrial revolution had not hit full stride yet,  which one could argue was the reason why it took so long for the cessation of slavery to occur.  During the industrial age it really didn’t matter who was pushing a button  on an assembly line. Also sentiments about what a woman’s place in the household was tied to family life and traditions held in the church.

World War 1 and Suffragette Parades

After World War 1 a lot of the old world had fallen away. You can see this in the period piece on PBS’ Downton Abbey.  Limited Automation, and women working in traditional men’s fields to produce war material for the war effort brought out a freedom women had not seen before. 

One of the ways in which women pushed their cause was to hold massive Suffragette Parades in some of the larger cities in the United States. Many women were arrested after these parades for demonstrating in public which was still illegal.

Suffragette Parade in NY City

Dr. Anna Shaw and Carrie Chapman Catt, founder of the League of Women Voters, lead an estimated 20,000 supporters in a women’s suffrage march on New York’s Fifth Ave. in 1915 . (AP Photo)


100 Years Later, Women on the Ballot is Common Place

Its been one hundred years since women were given the right to vote and it’s not a big deal as it was then.  There have been many women candidates, legislators, businesswomen, and even astronauts. Women have come a long way in this country.

Here are a list of current women legislators and candidates from the Republican Party:

Rep Mary Franson,  Senator Carrie Ruud,  Senator Julie Rosen,  Senator Carla Nelson,  Senator & Former Secretary of State Mary Kiffmeyer,  Senator Karin Housley,  Rep Deb Kiel, Senator Michelle Benson, former Mayor of Woodbury Mary Stephens, Margaret Stokely, Georgia Dietz, Amy Anderson, Sharon Anderson, to name a few.

And our very own HD 66B Republican Candidate Mikki Murray.


Information for this article came from History.com, and from the Secretary of State of Minnesota’s Candidate Filing website.